Editor’s note: This article features news and photos from past editions of The Ashe Mountain Times/Mountain Times from 2003 and 2009.

June 5, 2003

Todd Crowns New National Champion

On June 5, 2003 the Ashe Mountain Times reported that the community of Todd had crowned a new champion after a New Yorker edged out a local favorite for top resonator guitar player in first place. The contest was the First Annual Resonator Guitar National Championships. Hundreds of spectators filled Todd’s park to watch the contest and to witness four bands who had signed up to entertain them. The bands included Alternate Roots, Rock Bottom, Guitar Extravaganza and Blue Highway. According to the article the resonator guitar contest was close one, with 37 year-old David Bevins from Ticonderoga, N.Y., taking home the first place prize of a $2,500 Beard Custom guitar. Following closely behind was local favorite, picker Tony Reece of Zionville who came in second place. The newspaper stated that Bevins had played resonator guitar since he was 9 and “never played anything else.”

June 5, 2003

Ashe Civic Center Center host first production of ‘The Scarlett O’Hara Complex’

According to the June 5, 2003 edition of the Ashe Mountain Times, the Ashe Civic Center hosted its first production of a new play called “The Scarlett O’Hara Complex.” According to the article, the play was written by Wilkes County resident Karen Wheeling Reynolds and included elements of the Blanche Taylor Moore case — the true story of a North Carolina women who poisoned her husband — and the song “Earl Had to Die” from the Dixie Chicks. The play was a dark comedy that followed three best friends who feared their friend will kill her cheating husband Earl by poisoning his banana pudding. In the 2003 article the play’s writer stated that she had reached out to Blanche for information but was unsuccessful.

“I actually wrote to Blanche to see if she would talk to me, but she wouldn’t so I used things that I had learned about the story that are in public domain,” said Reynolds.

The play also addressed the idea of divorce in the south and how women have been expected to serve their husbands and families no matter the circumstance.

“My husband told me it will be a long time before he eats any banana pudding.” Reynolds joked in the article.

June 4, 2009 20-year old donates kidney to friend of nine months

On June 4, 2009 the Ashe Mountain Times reported that 37-year old Brian Coffey would be getting a “new lease on life” when he receives a new kidney from friend Louis Rodriguez at the Wake Forest University Medical Center in Winston Salem. According to the article Rodriguez has met Coffey while working at a restaurant in West Jefferson. The newspaper stated that the pair had only known each other nine months when Rodriguez discovered Coffey was suffering from a End Stage Renal Disease. After discovering that they both had type O positive blood, Rodriguez decided to donate a kidney to Coffey. “It feels great, I’m giving him his life back,” said Rodriguez in the 2009 article.

June 4, 2009

Tournament Raises more than $7,000 for clinic

The June 4, 2009 edition of the Ashe Mountain Times announced that more than $7,000 had been raised for the Ashe County Medical Clinic during a charity golf tournament. The newspaper stated that the tournament took place on Thursday, May 28, 2009 and featured 72 golfers on 18 teams. Greg Bolac,executive director of the clinic at the time of the article stated that every dollar raised will be turned into more than $4 worth of medical services for uninsured patients.

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